2020-2021 Calendar of Events

Go to Spring 2021 events

 Fall 2020 Events


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Fall 2020 Ethnographic Forum New Book Series - Event 1:

 

Todne Thomas: “Black Church Arson, Gentrification, and Reimaginations of the Neoliberal Commons”

Date: Monday, October 12, 2020 

Time: 12:30-1:45 pm

Zoom link: - https://emory.zoom.us/j/99813763465

 

In her forthcoming book Kincraft: The Making of Black Evangelical Society (Duke University Press, 2021) Todne Thomas explores the internal dynamics of community life among black evangelicals, who are often overshadowed by white evangelicals and the common equation of the “black Church” with an Afro-Protestant mainline. Drawing on fieldwork in an Afro-Caribbean and African American church association in Atlanta, Thomas locates black evangelicals at the center of their own religious story, presenting their determined spiritual relatedness as a form of insurgency. She outlines how church members co-create themselves as spiritual kin through what she calls kincraft—the construction of one another as brothers and sisters in Christ. Kincraft, which Thomas traces back to the diasporic histories and migration experiences of church members, reflects black evangelicals’ understanding of Christian familial connection as transcending racial, ethnic, and denominational boundaries in ways that go beyond the patriarchal nuclear family. Church members also use their spiritual relationships to navigate racial and ethnic discrimination within the majority-white evangelical movement. By charting kincraft’s functions and significance, Thomas demonstrates the ways in which black evangelical social life is more varied and multidimensional than standard narratives of evangelicalism would otherwise suggest.

 

Sponsored by the Department of Religion, Emory University

Fall 2020 Ethnographic Forum New Book Series - Event 2:

 

Hillary Kaell: "Christian Globalism at Home: Child Sponsorship in the United States” (Princeton University   Press, 2020)"

Date: Monday, November 9, 2020

Time: 12:30-1:45 pm

Zoom link: - https://emory.zoom.us/j/99813763465

 

Christian Globalism at Home: Child Sponsorship in the United States “(Princeton University Press, 2020) traces the movement of money, letters, and images, along with a wide array of sponsorship’s lesser-known embodied and aesthetic techniques, such as playacting, hymn singing, eating, and fasting. It shows how, through this process, U.S. Christians attempt to hone globalism of a particular sort by oscillating between the sensory experiences of a God’s eye view and the intimacy of human relatedness. These global aspirations are buoyed by grand hopes and subject to intractable limitations, since they so often rely on the inequities they claim to redress.

 

Sponsored by the Department of Religion, Emory University

Book Club: 'Antisemitism: Here and Now' with Deborah Lipstadt

Register now for an event based on Religion Department professor, Deborah Lipstadt’s recent book Antisemitism: Here and Now, a discussion moderated by Dean, Michael A. Elliott.

Date: Thursday, September 03, 2020

Time: 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm

Zoom link to be sent 


 

Spring 2021 Events


Religion Department Spring 2021 HAPPY HOUR—OPEN HOUSE—SOCIAL Zoom Event

 

Feeling disconnected?

You are invited to the Religion Department drop in HAPPY HOUR—OPEN HOUSE—SOCIAL Zoom Event

When: Jan 28, 2021, 06:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

 

Invite link:  https://emory.zoom.us/j/93475363149 

Contact: Candice George

Candice.george@emory.edu 

 

 

Sponsored by the Department of Religion, Emory University

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Spring 2021 Ethnographic Forum New Book Series - Event 1:

 

Khaled Furani, Tel-Aviv University: “Redeeming Anthropology: A Theological Critique of a Modern Science (Oxford University Press, 2019)”

Date: Monday, February 22, 2021 

Time: 12:30-2:00 pm

Zoom link: - https://emory.zoom.us/j/99813763465

 

Anthropologists have invariably engaged in their discipline as a form of redemption, whether to escape from social restriction, nourish their souls, reform their home polities, or vindicate "the natives." Redeeming Anthropology: A Theological Critique of a Modern Science explores how in pursuit of a secular science sired by the Enlightenment, adherents to a "faith in mankind" have vacillated between rejecting and embracing theology, albeit in concealed and contradictory ways. Mining the biographical registers of the American, British, and French anthropological traditions, Khaled Furani argues that despite all efforts to the contrary, theological sediments remain in this disciplining discipline. Rather than continuing to forget, deny, and sequester it, theology can serve as a mirror for introspection, as a source of critique offering invaluable tools for revitalization: for thinking anew not only anthropology's study of others' cultures, but also its very own reason.

 

Sponsored by the Department of Religion, and the Tam Institute for Jewish Studies, Emory University

Spring 2021 Ethnographic Forum New Book Series - Event 2:

 

Sibylle Lustenberger, University of Frieberg, Switzerland: “Judaism in Motion: The Making of Same-Sex Parenthood in Israel (Palgrave 2020)”

Date: Monday, March 22, 2021

Time: 12:30-2:00 pm

Zoom link: - https://emory.zoom.us/j/99813763465

 

Judaism in Motion. The Making of Same-Sex Parenthood in Israel (Palgrave 2020) examines the political, rabbinic, and cultural dynamics at play in the contemporary creation of gay and lesbian families. It follows same-sex couples on their path to parenthood to show how various actors – the couples, their families, medical personnel in fertility clinics, state workers, and rabbis – grapple with fundamental questions over the norms of reproduction and the authority to define them. In the debates and practices surrounding same-sex parenthood, religiously informed kinship principles and norms are transformed. At the same time, LGBT people from Orthodox homes increasingly form families of their own and thus raise new questions about the role of secular ideas for the making of Orthodox continuity. In addressing the transformation and translation of religious and secular principles, Judaism in Motion complicates the commonly held assumption that places same-sex parenthood in a radically secular sphere that stands in stark opposition to religion.

 

 

Sponsored by the Department of Religion, and the Tam Institute for Jewish Studies, Emory University

 


Alumni Connection Panel

We all know the study of religion is interesting, but what about important in your career—especially if your career isn’t going to be directly related to religion?

Join us on Monday, March 22, 2021, to hear from the Religion department alums about how their studies in the humanities at Emory led to a variety of exciting and fulfilling career pursuits.

Date: Monday, March 22, 2021

Time: 5:30-7:00 pm

Registration here

Zoom Code: 914 9494 2671

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