2019-2020 Calendar of Events

Go to Spring 2020 events

Fall 2019 Events


Archives, Urdu Literature, and Stranger Intimacy: A Genealogy of Jinnealogy

Lecture by Anand V. Taneja   

Part of the Emory Forum for the Ethnographic Study of Religion 2019

Monday, September 23, 2019 - 12:30 PM -2:00 PM

 S107 Callaway Memorial Center

In this session, I will talk about three aspects of the research for my book Jinnealogy: Time, Islam, and Ecological Thought in the Medieval Ruins of Delhi. One, archival work as ethnography. Anthropologists tend to approach the “archive” and the “field” in methodologically different ways, and also tend to think of them as producing different kinds of knowledge. Here, I will reflect on the insights I gleaned by approaching my quest for archival documents ethnographically. Secondly, I will reflect upon the way in which reading Urdu literature about Delhi—literary memoirs, popular theology, and antiquarian literature—while doing fieldwork, deepened and enriched my ethnographic engagement with place. Finally, I will reflect upon how a great part of the “stranger effect” of anthropological fieldwork might come not from the effect it has on one’s interlocutors, but rather, from the ways that participant-observation can be an act of radical estrangement: defamiliarizing one not just from a landscape one thought was familiar, but also from the habits and pre-conceptions of the self. 

Light lunch provided.

Sponsored by the Department of Religion and co-sponsored by South Asia Seminar, Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies of Emory University.

 

Doing Fieldwork in Revolutionary Times

Lecture by Angie Heo

Part of the Emory Forum for the Ethnographic Study of Religion 2019

Thursday, October 10, 2019 - 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

S501 Callaway Memorial Center

In stories from the field, adapting to unexpected conditions is nearly a rite of passage for anthropologists. But what does this celebrated trope of ethnographic authority mean when a country undergoes radical political transformation and against all conventional wisdom? Drawing on materials from Egypt that precede the 2011 revolution and follow the 2013 coup, this talk reflects on the limits and strategies of writing ethnography for the political present.

Light lunch provided. 

Sponsored by the Department of Religion, Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry, Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies, and Department of Anthropology of Emory University.

 

 

Faculty and Student Fall Social

The Religion department will be hosting a Faculty and Student Fall Social Event. This will be a great opportunity for Religion majors and minors students to meet with faculty members, enter for a prize giveaway and enjoy a free meal. 

Date: Monday, November 11, 2019

Time: 6pm to 8pm

Location: ESC Private Dining Room S111

 

 

Spring 2020 Events


Porosity and Boundedness: How the way we think about thinking changes our sensory experience of gods and spirits

Lecture by Tanya Luhrmann

Part of the Emory Forum for the Ethnographic Study of Religion 2020

Thursday, February 27, 2020 - 12:00 PM -1:30 PM

Rita Anne Rollins - Center for Ethics Room 162

This talk makes the argument that the way people think about their minds shapes the way they come to know God. I do this by looking at the kinds of people who have more vivid spiritual experiences (they are more likely to get absorbed in their inner worlds), the way prayers train attention to inner experience, and above all at the way that different cultures invite people to think differently about inner life. I see a paradox: the more a culture imagines an inner world as separate from an outer world, the less vividly they experience gods and spirits.

Light lunch provided.

 

Sponsored by the Department of Religion, Department of Anthropology, the Forum for the Ethnographic Study of Religion and the Candler School of Theology at Emory University.

 

THE SWEET REQUIEM

Please join us for the Atlanta premiere of this award-winning Tibetan film followed by Q & A with directors Ritu Sarin & Tenzing Sonam

Monday, March 2, 2020 - 7:00 PM -9:00 PM

Goodrich C. White Hall -  Room 206

When a young, exile Tibetan woman unexpectedly sees a man from her past, long-suppressed memories of her traumatic escape across the Himalayas are reignited and she is propelled on a search for reconciliation and closure.

 

Sponsored by: Department of Anthropology, Department of Film and Media Studies, Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies, Department of Religion, and Center for Contemplative Science and Compassion-Based Ethics, and the Candler School of Theology at Emory University.

 



You may also be interested in the The Tam Institute for Jewish Studies calendar of events, Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies Department events, Emory-Tibet Partnership events, and Aquinas Center events